Nutritional facts

Mussels are rich in proteins with a low calorie count; they may therefore form an essential part of a healthy diet. As an excellent source of iron mussels are beneficial for growth and immunity. Mussels are an important source of other minerals such as zinc, iodine and Selenium which help guarantee good health.

Mussels are a rich source of vitamins such as B1, B2, B12 and vitamin E. They help therefore maintain energy, repair damaged cells and have good anti oxidation properties.

Macronutrient Content of Shellfish

(Per 100g raw edible portion unless otherwise stated)

Type of Seafood Water g Protein g Lipid g Carbohydrate g Energy kcal Energy kj
Oyster 85.7 10.8 1.3 2.7 65 275
Mussel 80.9 12.1 1.8 2.5 75 312
Crab(boiled) 71.0 19.5 5.5 tr 128 535
Prawn 79.2 17.6 0.6 0 76 321

tr= trace amounts only

Source: Holland, B., Brown, J., & Buss, D.H., 1993. Fish and Fish Products, the third supplement to McCance & Widdowson’s The Composotion of Foods (5th Edition), HMSO, London

Vitamins

Mussels are rich are particularly rich in vitamin B2 and B12. The Vitamin B12 plays a key role in the normal functioning of the brain and nervous system. The Vitamin B2 also known as riboflavin is an easily absorbed micronutrient which is required for a variety of cellular processed and plays a key role in energy metabolism.

Vitamin Content of Fish and Shellfish

(Per 100g raw edible portion unless otherwise stated)

Type of Seafood Vitamin Amcg Vitamin Dmcg Vitamin Emg Vitamin B1mg Vitamin B2mg Vitamin B6mg Vitamin B12mg
Oyster 75 1 0.85 0.15 0.19 0.16 17
Haddock tr tr 0.39 0.04 0.07 0.39 1
Mackerel 45 8.2 0.43 0.14 0.29 0.41 8
Salmon 13 5.9 1.91 0.23 0.13 0.75 4
Mussel n tr 0.74 0.02 0.35 0.08 19
Tuna 26 7.2 n 0.10 0.13 0.38 4
Prawn tr tr 2.85 0.04 0.12 0.05 7

tr= trace amounts only; n= data not available, mg= milligrams; mcg = micrograms

Source: Holland, B., Brown, J., & Buss, D.H., 1993. Fish and Fish Products, the third supplement to McCance & Widdowson’s The Composition of Foods (5th Edition), HMSO, London

Mineral Content

Mussels have excellent levels of Sodium, Potassium, Iron and iodine.

Sodium is an essential element for our body, the sodium ions are used by our cells to build their electrostatic charge and thus allow transmission of nerve impulses. Sodium is classified as a “dietary inorganic macro-mineral” for animals. Sodium’s relative rarity on land is due to its solubility in water.

Iron intake is important to avoid iron anemia which leads fatigue and weakness. Women are particularly vulnerable to Iron anemia during childbearing age.

Iodine is required for production of the thyroid hormones a key hormone acting on gene transcription.

Mineral Content of Selected Fish and Shellfish

(Per 100g raw edible portion unless otherwise stated)

Type of Seafood Sodium mg Potassium mg Calcium mg Iron mg Zinc mg Iodine Mcg Selenium mcg
Oyster 510 260 140 5.7 59.2 60 23
Haddock 67 360 14 0.1 0.4 250 27
Mackerel 63 290 11 0.8 0.6 140 30
Salmon 45 360 21 0.4 0.6 37 26
Mussel 290 320 38 5.8 2.5 140 51
Tuna 47 400 16 1.3 0.7 30 57
Prawn 190 330 79 1.6 1.5 21 16

tr= trace amounts only; n= data not available, mg= milligrams; mcg = micrograms

Source: Holland, B., Brown, J., & Buss, D.H., 1993. Fish and Fish Products, the third supplement to McCance & Widdowson’s The Composotion of Foods (5th Edition), HMSO, London

Polyunsaturated fat: Omega 3

Mussels have a good EPA and DHA ratio.

Omega 3, EPA and DHA are important nutrients to support optimal brain/visual performance, for cardio care, and other health conditions for young and old alike.

n-3 Polyunsaturated Content of Selected Fish and Shellfish

(Per 100g raw edible portion unless otherwise stated)

Type of Fish Total Lipid Content Polyunsaturated n-3 Fatty Acids EPA 20:5 n-3 Fatty Acids DHA 22:6
Oyster 1.3 0.5 0.14 0.16
Herring 13.2 2.7 0.51 0.69
Mackerel 16.1 3.3 0.7 1.1
Salmon 11.0 3.1 0.5 0.86
Mussel 1.8 0.6 0.47 0.45
Tuna 4.6 1.6 0.02 0.14
Crab (boiled) 5.5 1.6 0.47 0.45

Source: Holland, B., Brown, J., & Buss, D.H., 1993. Fish and Fish Products, the third supplement to McCance & Widdowson’s The Composotion of Foods (5th Edition), HMSO, London

Nutritious comparison with other foods

A Comparison of Nutrients in Fish and Other Foods

(Per 100g raw edible portion unless otherwise stated)

Type of Seafood Proteing Lipidg Vitamin A as retinol, carotenoid in mcg Vitamin DMcg B12mcg Ironmg Iodinemcg Selenium

mcg

Cod 18.3 0.7 2 Tr 1 0.1 110 28
Haddock 19.0 0.6 tr Tr 1 0.1 250 27
Herring 17.8 13.2 44 19 13 1.2 29 35
Mackerel 18.7 16.1 45 8.2 8 0.8 140 30
Oyster 10.8 1.3 75 1 17 5.7 60 23
Mussel 12.1 1.8 n Tr 19 5.8 140 51
Carrots 0.6 0.3 0 (12472) 0 0 0.3 2 1
Cabbage 1.7 0.4 0 (1150) 0 0 0.7 2 1
Apples 0.3 0.1 0 (17) 0 0 0.1 tr tr
Beef 22.5 4.3 tr (0) 0.5 2.0 2.7 10 7
Chicken 22.3 2.1 tr (tr) Tr tr 0.7 6 13
Milk 3.3 3.9 30 (19) Tr 0.9 0.03 31 1

tr= trace amounts only; n= data not available, mg= milligrams; mcg = micrograms

Source: Holland, B., Brown, J., & Buss, D.H., 1993. Fish and Fish Products, the third supplement to McCance & Widdowson’s The Composition of Foods (5th Edition), HMSO, London